Erosion

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Erosion along natural steam and riverbanks can increase sedimentSoil, sand and minerals washed from land into water, usually after rain. They pile up in reservoirs, rivers and harbors, destroying fish-nesting areas and holes of water animals and cloud the water so that needed sunlight might not reach aquatic plans. Careless farming, mining and building activities will expose sediment materials, allowing them to be washed off the land after rainfalls. deposition in stormwater management systems[1]. The accumulation of sedimentSoil, sand and minerals washed from land into water, usually after rain. They pile up in reservoirs, rivers and harbors, destroying fish-nesting areas and holes of water animals and cloud the water so that needed sunlight might not reach aquatic plans. Careless farming, mining and building activities will expose sediment materials, allowing them to be washed off the land after rainfalls. overtime exerts a stress on stormwater systems, as their overall volume capacity for water becomes reduced[2].

The Sustainable Technologies Evaluation Program guide to SedimentSoil, sand and minerals washed from land into water, usually after rain. They pile up in reservoirs, rivers and harbors, destroying fish-nesting areas and holes of water animals and cloud the water so that needed sunlight might not reach aquatic plans. Careless farming, mining and building activities will expose sediment materials, allowing them to be washed off the land after rainfalls. and Erosion Control can be found here.


  1. McDonough, K., Moore, T., & Hutchinson, S. (2017). Understanding the relationship between stormwater control measures and ecosystem services in an urban watershed. J. Water Resources and Planning Management, 143 (5)
  2. Bledsoe, B. (2002). Stream erosion potential and stormwater management strategies. Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management, 128 (6), 451-455.