Mulch

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Pine mulcha top dressing over vegetation beds that provides suppresses weeds and helps retain soil moisture in bioretention cells, stormwater planters and dry swales. will help hold moisture in the soil
  • Mulcha top dressing over vegetation beds that provides suppresses weeds and helps retain soil moisture in bioretention cells, stormwater planters and dry swales. should be applied on the surface of the BMPBest management practice. State of the art methods or techniques used to manage the quantity and improve the quality of wet weather flow. BMPs include: source, conveyance and end-of-pipe controls. in a layer of 75 -100 mm.
  • As in other landscaping applications, the mulcha top dressing over vegetation beds that provides suppresses weeds and helps retain soil moisture in bioretention cells, stormwater planters and dry swales. helps to preserve soil moisture for plant survival, and suppresses weed growth.
  • Mulcha top dressing over vegetation beds that provides suppresses weeds and helps retain soil moisture in bioretention cells, stormwater planters and dry swales. is considered to be an normal finishing touch to many types of formal landscaping. Maintaining mulcha top dressing over vegetation beds that provides suppresses weeds and helps retain soil moisture in bioretention cells, stormwater planters and dry swales. application can help increase aesthetic value of LIDLow Impact Development. A stormwater management strategy that seeks to mitigate the impacts of increased urban runoff and stormwater pollution by managing it as close to its source as possible. It comprises a set of site design approaches and small scale stormwater management practices that promote the use of natural systems for infiltration and evapotranspiration, and rainwater harvesting. BMPs.
  • Regular fresh applications of wood mulcha top dressing over vegetation beds that provides suppresses weeds and helps retain soil moisture in bioretention cells, stormwater planters and dry swales. can also promote denitrification, reducing nitrates in impacted surface waters.
  • Shredded hardwood mulcha top dressing over vegetation beds that provides suppresses weeds and helps retain soil moisture in bioretention cells, stormwater planters and dry swales. or pine mulcha top dressing over vegetation beds that provides suppresses weeds and helps retain soil moisture in bioretention cells, stormwater planters and dry swales. is generally recommended for LIDLow Impact Development. A stormwater management strategy that seeks to mitigate the impacts of increased urban runoff and stormwater pollution by managing it as close to its source as possible. It comprises a set of site design approaches and small scale stormwater management practices that promote the use of natural systems for infiltration and evapotranspiration, and rainwater harvesting. facilities. Its fibrous texture knits together somewhat; providing limited erosion controlIncludes the protection of soil from dislocation by water, wind or other agents..

Contraindication

  • In areas with particularly high flow (e.g. around inlets and forebays) coarse decorative aggregateA broad category of particulate material used in construction, including sand, gravel, crushed stone, slag, recycled concrete and geosynthetic aggregates, and available in various particulate size gradations. or stone is recommended instead, as these will not float. All organic mulches have the potential to float and migrate in surface flow, particularly after a previously dry period. [1]
  • This advice also holds for stormwater planters, which often experience concentrated flow from a downspout disconnection or similar.

  1. Simcock, R and Dando, J. 2013. Mulch specification for stormwater bioretention devices. Prepared by Landcare Research New Zealand Ltd for Auckland Council. Auckland Council technical report, TR2013/056