Difference between revisions of "Stone"

From LID SWM Planning and Design Guide
Jump to: navigation, search
m
m (Undo revision 6224 by Kyle menken (talk))
Line 1: Line 1:
 
[[File: FILL IN |thumb|This rain garden in a school yard uses stone as both decorative edging and for erosion control.]]
 
[[File: FILL IN |thumb|This rain garden in a school yard uses stone as both decorative edging and for erosion control.]]
[[File: IMAX Stone Inlet.jpeg|thumb|This bioswale in a parking lot uses stone at the inlets and along the bottom of the swale to prevent erosion, as the sides are sloped.]]
+
[[File: IMAX_Stone_Inlet.jpg|thumb|This bioswale in a parking lot uses stone at the inlets and along the bottom of the swale to prevent erosion, as the sides are sloped.]]
  
 
For advice on aggregates used in [[Underdrains]], see [[Gravel]]
 
For advice on aggregates used in [[Underdrains]], see [[Gravel]]

Revision as of 13:26, 2 January 2018

File:FILL IN
This rain gardenA lot level bioretention cell designed to receive and detain, infiltrate and filter runoff, typically used for discharge from downspouts. in a school yard uses stone as both decorative edging and for erosion controlIncludes the protection of soil from dislocation by water, wind or other agents..
File:IMAX Stone Inlet.jpg
This bioswaleLinear bioretention cell designed to convey, treat and attenuate stormwater runoff. The engineered filter media soil mixture and vegetation slows the runoff water to allow sedimentation, filtration through the root zone, evapotranspiration, and infiltration into the underlying native soil. in a parking lot uses stone at the inlets and along the bottom of the swaleA shallow constructed channel, often grass-lined, which is used as an alternative to curb and channel, or as a pretreatment to other measures. Swales are generally characterized by a broad top width to depth ratio and gentle grades. to prevent erosion(1) The wearing away of the land surface by moving water, wind, ice or other geological agents, including such processes as gravitation creep; (2) Detachment and movement of soil or rock fragments by water, wind, ice or gravity (i.e. Accelerated, geological, gully, natural, rill, sheet, splash, or impact, etc)., as the sides are sloped.

For advice on aggregatesA broad category of particulate material used in construction, including sand, gravel, crushed stone, slag, recycled concrete and geosynthetic aggregates, and available in various particulate size gradations. used in Underdrains, see Gravel

Stone can serve as a low maintenance decorative feature, but it may also serve practical functions in an LIDLow Impact Development. A stormwater management strategy that seeks to mitigate the impacts of increased urban runoff and stormwater pollution by managing it as close to its source as possible. It comprises a set of site design approaches and small scale stormwater management practices that promote the use of natural systems for infiltration and evapotranspiration, and rainwater harvesting. practice. Typical stone functions in LIDLow Impact Development. A stormwater management strategy that seeks to mitigate the impacts of increased urban runoff and stormwater pollution by managing it as close to its source as possible. It comprises a set of site design approaches and small scale stormwater management practices that promote the use of natural systems for infiltration and evapotranspiration, and rainwater harvesting. and direction on selection:

Dissipate flow and prevent erosion at inlets and outlets

  • Angular crushed stone, which will "knit" or lock together and be less likely to shift, is recommended. However, for aesthetic purposes, smooth river-run stone may be desired.
  • Determine stone size by flow velocities at inlets and outlets. Typical stone for this purpose ranges between 50 mm and 250 mm. The larger the stone, the more energy dissipation.
  • Stone beds should be twice as thick as the largest stone's diameter.
  • To prevent erosion of soils beneath the stone and the migration of the stone into the soil, the stone bed should be underlain by a drainage geotextile.

Direct and spread flow throughout a large LIDLow Impact Development. A stormwater management strategy that seeks to mitigate the impacts of increased urban runoff and stormwater pollution by managing it as close to its source as possible. It comprises a set of site design approaches and small scale stormwater management practices that promote the use of natural systems for infiltration and evapotranspiration, and rainwater harvesting. facility or to protect narrow channel sections where flow will concentrate

  • While crushed stone will be less likely to shift, river-run stone may be used to create a dry-stream-bed look.
  • The sizing of the gravel will depend on the expected velocities.