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They are can be sited in large landscaped areas, parks, parking lot islands, or any areas where there is space for shallow earthen slopes and the multi-zone planting aesthetic is appropriate.
 
They are can be sited in large landscaped areas, parks, parking lot islands, or any areas where there is space for shallow earthen slopes and the multi-zone planting aesthetic is appropriate.
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==Drainage Areas==
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==Drainage areas==
 
There are two basic categories:
 
There are two basic categories:
 
#Exposure to roadway or parking lot runoff. Runoff is contaminated with deicers and vehicle pollutants. These can take on several forms, including parking lot islands, traffic islands, roundabouts, or cul-de-sacs and are often used as [[snow]] storage location
 
#Exposure to roadway or parking lot runoff. Runoff is contaminated with deicers and vehicle pollutants. These can take on several forms, including parking lot islands, traffic islands, roundabouts, or cul-de-sacs and are often used as [[snow]] storage location
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*What is the composition of the nearby natural area?  
 
*What is the composition of the nearby natural area?  
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==Native, Introduced and Rare Plants==
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==Native, introduced and rare plants==
 
The goal of planting design for LID practices is to achieve a sustainable vegetation community that is tailored to the ecological qualities of the site and the aesthetic considerations of the landowner. Plant selection for LID practices is predicated on the principle of ‘right plant for the right place'. Many LID practices are carried out within a highly urbanized context that poses unnatural stresses on plant growth and survival. This guide provides general recommendations to direct species selection. Landscape professionals should use this information to generate specific plant lists that are tailored to the conditions prevalent on site while addressing surrounding urban and natural land uses.  
 
The goal of planting design for LID practices is to achieve a sustainable vegetation community that is tailored to the ecological qualities of the site and the aesthetic considerations of the landowner. Plant selection for LID practices is predicated on the principle of ‘right plant for the right place'. Many LID practices are carried out within a highly urbanized context that poses unnatural stresses on plant growth and survival. This guide provides general recommendations to direct species selection. Landscape professionals should use this information to generate specific plant lists that are tailored to the conditions prevalent on site while addressing surrounding urban and natural land uses.  
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===Native and Introduced Species===
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===Native and introduced species===
 
Native plants have co-evolved with the local ecosystems and natural processes. They are genetically better adapted to local climate, soils, insects and diseases of the area, and may require less maintenance to ensure health and survival. Working with native plants helps protect local native biodiversity, allows the LID feature to function ecologically while creating a more diverse, naturally-beautiful, landscape.   
 
Native plants have co-evolved with the local ecosystems and natural processes. They are genetically better adapted to local climate, soils, insects and diseases of the area, and may require less maintenance to ensure health and survival. Working with native plants helps protect local native biodiversity, allows the LID feature to function ecologically while creating a more diverse, naturally-beautiful, landscape.   
 
Where conditions for growing native plants are inhospitable, diversifying the planting palate with introduced species may have a more successful result. In addition to native species, many introduced plants are grown in nurseries and garden centers and are readily available to landowners.  
 
Where conditions for growing native plants are inhospitable, diversifying the planting palate with introduced species may have a more successful result. In addition to native species, many introduced plants are grown in nurseries and garden centers and are readily available to landowners.  

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