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rare species are not suitable for planting unless the local source/provenance is documented and approved. Rare species should only be used sparingly when there are no suitable common species available and reasons for selection should be provided. Where rare species are included in a design, it should be ensured that the plants are procured from locally adapted  seed sources. Biologists, botanists and ecologists can help guide the sourcing and selection of plant material. Nurseries that specialize in native plants should be contacted to source material.
 
rare species are not suitable for planting unless the local source/provenance is documented and approved. Rare species should only be used sparingly when there are no suitable common species available and reasons for selection should be provided. Where rare species are included in a design, it should be ensured that the plants are procured from locally adapted  seed sources. Biologists, botanists and ecologists can help guide the sourcing and selection of plant material. Nurseries that specialize in native plants should be contacted to source material.
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==Natural Processes==
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==Natural processes==
 
A plant community is not a static entity; rather it is always growing and changing in response to natural processes and disturbance events. When utilizing a plant community as an analogue for design, it is essential to understand the role of agents that affect the composition of the plant community over time. Designers and managers may need to mimic or compensate for the natural processes in a management plan. Consideration should be given for the impact of natural processes and disturbances to the long term vision of the LID landscape design. Natural ecosystems develop and are maintained through natural changes such as the onset of shading, and disturbance events such as:
 
A plant community is not a static entity; rather it is always growing and changing in response to natural processes and disturbance events. When utilizing a plant community as an analogue for design, it is essential to understand the role of agents that affect the composition of the plant community over time. Designers and managers may need to mimic or compensate for the natural processes in a management plan. Consideration should be given for the impact of natural processes and disturbances to the long term vision of the LID landscape design. Natural ecosystems develop and are maintained through natural changes such as the onset of shading, and disturbance events such as:
 
*Seasonal storm events / flooding outside the design norms
 
*Seasonal storm events / flooding outside the design norms

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