Pollution prevention

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When assessing LIDLow Impact Development. A stormwater management strategy that seeks to mitigate the impacts of increased urban runoff and stormwater pollution by managing it as close to its source as possible. It comprises a set of site design approaches and small scale stormwater management practices that promote the use of natural systems for infiltration and evapotranspiration, and rainwater harvesting. options on your site, identifying pollution threats is an important part of the pre-design process. Applying the principles of pollution prevention, -- the use of processes, practices, materials, products, substances or energy that avoid or minimize the creation of pollutants and waste, and reduce the overall risk to the environmentRefers to the conditions in which an organism lives and survives or the conditions in which an organism resides. These conditions can be described as aspects of a “physical”, “social” or an “economic” environment, depending on the perspective perceived by the observer. and human health -- can help eliminate those pollution threats, ensure compliance with regulations and bylaws, and create a safer environmentRefers to the conditions in which an organism lives and survives or the conditions in which an organism resides. These conditions can be described as aspects of a “physical”, “social” or an “economic” environment, depending on the perspective perceived by the observer. for staff and customers.

P2 is about anticipating and preventing pollution instead of reacting to it after a spill or release has occurred. It is part of an ongoing pollution management approach that is comprised of prevention, control and clean-up.

P2 opportunities can be found throughout any site or operation. For instance, installing different equipment or technology, or changing raw materials or staff routines can result in pollution prevention.


The ways in which P2 is achieved varies from one sector to another, but typically there are nine common opportunities:

Dumpster management

Dumpsters can be a major source of pollution that can affect water quality. When dumpster lids are left open rainwater is able to mix with the trash, resulting in a leaking fluid, or “dumpster juice” that can contain toxic organic and inorganic materials. If not treated, this dumpster juice can enter the storm drain system, contributing to poor water quality.

Grease management

Restaurants produce grease and other wastes as a by-product of normal food preparation. If grease is dumped or washed into sewers or storm drains, it can cause sanitary sewer overflows or stormwater runoffThat potion of the water precipitated onto a catchment area, which flows as surface discharge from the catchment area past a specified point.Water from rain, snow melt, or irrigation that flows over the land surface. pollution. Restaurants can implement simple and low-cost P2 practices and train workers to properly dispose of used waste.

Parking lot maintenance

Maintenance operations have the potential to pollute stormwater runoffThat potion of the water precipitated onto a catchment area, which flows as surface discharge from the catchment area past a specified point.Water from rain, snow melt, or irrigation that flows over the land surface. if sensible P2 practices are not employed. This is particularly true of power washing, which can deliver sedimentSoil, sand and minerals washed from land into water, usually after rain. They pile up in reservoirs, rivers and harbors, destroying fish-nesting areas and holes of water animals and cloud the water so that needed sunlight might not reach aquatic plans. Careless farming, mining and building activities will expose sediment materials, allowing them to be washed off the land after rainfalls., nutrients, hydrocarbons, and other pollutants to the storm drain system.

Building maintenance

Some building maintenance practices produce polluted wash water that can directly enter the storm drain system during dry weather, whereas others deposit fine particles or liquids that can wash away into stormsewers during wet weather. ==Landscaping and grounds care == Landscaping services are generally performed by a lawn care/ landscaping contractor or an in-house maintenance crew. Poor landscaping practices can create stormwaterSurface runoff from at-grade surfaces, resulting from rain or snowmelt events. pollution, particularly in urban areas where soils are compacted.

Outdoor storage

The risk of stormwater pollution is greatest for operations that store large quantities of liquids or bulk materials at sites that are connected to the storm drain system. Protecting outdoor storage areas is a simple and effective P2 practice. ==Vehicle maintenance and repair == Often, vehicles that are wrecked or awaiting repair can be a concern if leaking fluids are exposed to stormwater runoffThat potion of the water precipitated onto a catchment area, which flows as surface discharge from the catchment area past a specified point.Water from rain, snow melt, or irrigation that flows over the land surface.. Vehicle