Difference between revisions of "Mulch"

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[[File:Wood chip mulch.jpg|thumb|Pine mulch will help hold moisture in the soil]]
 
[[File:Wood chip mulch.jpg|thumb|Pine mulch will help hold moisture in the soil]]
*Mulch should be applied on the surface of the BMP in a layer of 75 -100 mm.
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*As in other landscaping applications, the mulch helps to preserve soil moisture for plant survival, and suppresses weed growth.
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In addition to its aesthetic qualities, mulch is an essential functional component of many LID practices. Mulch assists in
*Mulch is considered to be an normal finishing touch to many types of formal landscaping. Maintaining mulch application can help increase aesthetic value of LID BMPs.
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reducing soil erosion, retaining moisture for the plant material, moderating soil
*Shredded hardwood mulch is generally recommended for LID facilities. Its fibrous texture knits together somewhat; providing limited erosion control. In areas with particularly high flow (e.g. around inlets) inorganic mulch or coarse decorative aggregate is recommended instead, as these will not float. All organic mulches have the potential to float and migrate in surface flow, after a previously dry period. <ref> Simcock, R and Dando, J. 2013. Mulch specification for stormwater bioretention devices. Prepared by Landcare Research New Zealand Ltd for Auckland Council. Auckland Council technical report, TR2013/056 </ref>
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temperature, preventing surface sealing and reducing colonization by opportunistic weed
*Regular fresh applications of wood mulch also promotes denitrification, reducing nitrates in impacted surface waters.
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species. Wood mulch allows for the cation exchange that occurs in the upper organic
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layer of the soil, capturing heavy metals. Regular fresh applications of wood mulch also promotes denitrification, reducing nitrates in impacted surface waters.
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Mulch should be applied on the surface of bioretention practices at a minimum depth of 75 mm and added to cover bare
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areas in order to avoid erosion. Mulch should only be removed and replaced when
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contamination has become a concern, when clogging has occurred, or when surface
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storage volume has been reduced.
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Avoid the use of [[Stone|stone]] as a cover for vegetated practices. While stone is a low
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maintenance surface treatment, it hinders the addition of plant matter and formation of
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topsoil and does not provide the same treatment benefits as mulch. Also,
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the stone can be problematic for maintenance if it migrates into the soil.
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The use of landscape fabric is a common method of reducing weed species in many
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landscapes. However, because landscape fabric is likely to become clogged with
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sediment in an LID facility, it is not recommended.
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Shredded hardwood mulch is generally recommended for LID facilities. Its fibrous texture knits together somewhat; providing limited erosion control. In areas with particularly high flow (e.g. around inlets) inorganic mulch or coarse decorative aggregate is recommended instead, as these will not float. All organic mulches have the potential to float and migrate in surface flow after a previously dry period. <ref> Simcock, R and Dando, J. 2013. Mulch specification for stormwater bioretention devices. Prepared by Landcare Research New Zealand Ltd for Auckland Council. Auckland Council technical report, TR2013/056 </ref>
 
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[[Category:Materials]]
 
[[Category:Materials]]
 
[[Category:Green infrastructure]]
 
[[Category:Green infrastructure]]

Revision as of 14:28, 10 January 2018

Pine mulcha top dressing over vegetation beds that provides suppresses weeds and helps retain soil moisture in bioretention cells, stormwater planters and dry swales. will help hold moisture in the soil

In addition to its aesthetic qualities, mulcha top dressing over vegetation beds that provides suppresses weeds and helps retain soil moisture in bioretention cells, stormwater planters and dry swales. is an essential functional component of many LIDLow Impact Development. A stormwater management strategy that seeks to mitigate the impacts of increased urban runoff and stormwater pollution by managing it as close to its source as possible. It comprises a set of site design approaches and small scale stormwater management practices that promote the use of natural systems for infiltration and evapotranspiration, and rainwater harvesting. practices. Mulcha top dressing over vegetation beds that provides suppresses weeds and helps retain soil moisture in bioretention cells, stormwater planters and dry swales. assists in reducing soil erosion(1) The wearing away of the land surface by moving water, wind, ice or other geological agents, including such processes as gravitation creep; (2) Detachment and movement of soil or rock fragments by water, wind, ice or gravity (i.e. Accelerated, geological, gully, natural, rill, sheet, splash, or impact, etc)., retaining moisture for the plant material, moderating soil temperature, preventing surface sealing and reducing colonization by opportunistic weed species. Wood mulcha top dressing over vegetation beds that provides suppresses weeds and helps retain soil moisture in bioretention cells, stormwater planters and dry swales. allows for the cation exchange that occurs in the upper organic layer of the soil, capturing heavy metals. Regular fresh applications of wood mulcha top dressing over vegetation beds that provides suppresses weeds and helps retain soil moisture in bioretention cells, stormwater planters and dry swales. also promotes denitrification, reducing nitrates in impacted surface waters.


Mulcha top dressing over vegetation beds that provides suppresses weeds and helps retain soil moisture in bioretention cells, stormwater planters and dry swales. should be applied on the surface of bioretentionA shallow excavated surface depression containing prepared filter media, mulch, and planted with selected vegetation. practices at a minimum depth of 75 mm and added to cover bare areas in order to avoid erosion(1) The wearing away of the land surface by moving water, wind, ice or other geological agents, including such processes as gravitation creep; (2) Detachment and movement of soil or rock fragments by water, wind, ice or gravity (i.e. Accelerated, geological, gully, natural, rill, sheet, splash, or impact, etc).. Mulcha top dressing over vegetation beds that provides suppresses weeds and helps retain soil moisture in bioretention cells, stormwater planters and dry swales. should only be removed and replaced when contamination has become a concern, when clogging has occurred, or when surface storage volume has been reduced.


Avoid the use of stone as a cover for vegetated practices. While stone is a low maintenance surface treatment, it hinders the addition of plant matter and formation of topsoil and does not provide the same treatment benefits as mulcha top dressing over vegetation beds that provides suppresses weeds and helps retain soil moisture in bioretention cells, stormwater planters and dry swales.. Also, the stone can be problematic for maintenance if it migrates into the soil.


The use of landscape fabric is a common method of reducing weed species in many landscapes. However, because landscape fabric is likely to become clogged with sedimentSoil, sand and minerals washed from land into water, usually after rain. They pile up in reservoirs, rivers and harbors, destroying fish-nesting areas and holes of water animals and cloud the water so that needed sunlight might not reach aquatic plans. Careless farming, mining and building activities will expose sediment materials, allowing them to be washed off the land after rainfalls. in an LIDLow Impact Development. A stormwater management strategy that seeks to mitigate the impacts of increased urban runoff and stormwater pollution by managing it as close to its source as possible. It comprises a set of site design approaches and small scale stormwater management practices that promote the use of natural systems for infiltration and evapotranspiration, and rainwater harvesting. facility, it is not recommended.


Shredded hardwood mulcha top dressing over vegetation beds that provides suppresses weeds and helps retain soil moisture in bioretention cells, stormwater planters and dry swales. is generally recommended for LIDLow Impact Development. A stormwater management strategy that seeks to mitigate the impacts of increased urban runoff and stormwater pollution by managing it as close to its source as possible. It comprises a set of site design approaches and small scale stormwater management practices that promote the use of natural systems for infiltration and evapotranspiration, and rainwater harvesting. facilities. Its fibrous texture knits together somewhat; providing limited erosion controlIncludes the protection of soil from dislocation by water, wind or other agents.. In areas with particularly high flow (e.g. around inlets) inorganic mulcha top dressing over vegetation beds that provides suppresses weeds and helps retain soil moisture in bioretention cells, stormwater planters and dry swales. or coarse decorative aggregateA broad category of particulate material used in construction, including sand, gravel, crushed stone, slag, recycled concrete and geosynthetic aggregates, and available in various particulate size gradations. is recommended instead, as these will not float. All organic mulches have the potential to float and migrate in surface flow after a previously dry period. [1]
  1. Simcock, R and Dando, J. 2013. Mulcha top dressing over vegetation beds that provides suppresses weeds and helps retain soil moisture in bioretention cells, stormwater planters and dry swales. specification for stormwater bioretentionA shallow excavated surface depression containing prepared filter media, mulch, and planted with selected vegetation. devices. Prepared by Landcare Research New Zealand Ltd for Auckland Council. Auckland Council technical report, TR2013/056