Bioretention: Variations

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Types of bioretentionA shallow excavated surface depression containing prepared filter media, mulch, and planted with selected vegetation. cell
FormCharacteristicsExamples
Infiltrating cellsUsed in developments with large landscaping areas, parks, parking lot islands, or any areas without tight space constraints. They have side slopes ≥2:1. Often, they receive sheet flow, but in some cases they are surrounded by curbs and will have inlets. The distinction between these options will determine the recommended types of pre-treatment.
Rain gardensOften found on residential sites or on land managed by community organisations . This simple variation may be constructed by the property owner and usually excludes the storage layer. See main article on rain gardens
BioretentionA shallow excavated surface depression containing prepared filter media, mulch, and planted with selected vegetation. planters (stormwater planters)Typically used in ultra-urban areas adjacent to buildings and in plazas. They appear similar to traditional landscaped beds, but differ by receiving runoffThat potion of the water precipitated onto a catchment area, which flows as surface discharge from the catchment area past a specified point.Water from rain, snow melt, or irrigation that flows over the land surface. from nearby surfaces.Image here
Extended tree pits (parallel bioretentionA shallow excavated surface depression containing prepared filter media, mulch, and planted with selected vegetation.)Located within the right-of-way, occupying the space between sidewalk and street. The inlets can be positioned on either or both sides, and are designed to prevent the system from filling beyond a fixed capacity. When ponding occurs, stormwater bypasses the inlets, making this a 'parallel' system rather than a flow-though or online design.
Curb extensions (bump outs)Installed in road-right-of-way, these function as a stormwater facility and a traffic calming measure. Inlets are integrated into the raised concrete curb and receive flow from the street side.Image here